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Cyber Monday Is Finally Here!: Take 20% Off EVERYTHING in the Decibel Store!

Today only, EVERY ITEM in the Decibel webstore is 20% OFF!

That means discounts across the board on books (including The Scott Burns Sessions: A Life in Death Metal 1987 – 1987, Evolution of the Cult—Restored, Expanded & Definitive EditionAmorphis: The Official Story of Finland’s Greatest Metal Band,  Turned Inside Out: The Official Story of ObituaryUSBM and Rotting Ways to Misery: The History of Finnish Death Metal), limited edition exclusive vinyl (including Decibel Records releases from Deadguy and Venomous Concept, back issues, shirts, Metal & Beer Fest merch, flexi boxes, Decibel subscriptions, and anything else on earth with the Decibel logo on it! 20% off for the next 24 hours only!

This Cyber Monday special concludes at 11:59 p.m. EST tonight. So, hurry into the dB store now, stock up for the metalhead on your holiday list and save big!

NOTE: Tickets to Decibel Magazine events, including Decibel Magazine Metal & Beer Fest: Denver 2023 and Decibel Magazine Metal & Beer Fest: Philly 2024 are NOT included in this sale.

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Decibel’s Black Friday Sale Returns: Get TWO FREE Issues of Decibel!

Black Friday has once again descended upon the consuming masses. Decibel is here to lean into our darkest timeline and hope to make your holidays black as pitch. Sign up for a 12-month or 24-month Decibel subscription (deluxe or basic) and we’ll include TWO additional issues for FREE. We’re here to help you save money on that special hesher in your life (let’s be honest, it’s probably you).

This special Blackest Friday offer ends at 11:59 p.m. EST on Monday, November 27. Don’t let this offer slip away into the darkness, click below and save!

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All Ticket Options for Metal & Beer Fest: Philly 2024 AVAILABLE NOW! Daily Lineups Revealed!

Decibel decided that it would be in your best interest to get tickets to Decibel Magazine Metal & Beer Fest: Philly—the world’s loudest, two-day craft beer event—when it returns to the Fillmore Philly on April 12-13, 2024! So what are you waiting for? Daily lineups and info on each ticket option below. Both days of the event sold out in 2021, so get your tickets now!

Purchase Decibel Magazine Metal & Beer Fest: Philly Two-Day tickets
Purchase Decibel Magazine Metal & Beer Fest: Philly April 12 tickets
Purchase Decibel Magazine Metal & Beer Fest: Philly April 13 tickets

APRIL 12, 2024
Biohazard (special Urban Discipline set)
Crowbar (special Odd Fellows Rest + Crowbar set)
Jesus Piece
Internal Bleeding
Enforced
Terminal Nation
Witching

APRIL 13, 2024
Deicide (special Deicide + Legion + Once Upon the Cross set)
Dying Fetus (special “old-school” set)
Tomb Mold
200 Stab Wounds
Will Haven
Lamp of Murmuur
Daeva

Just Metal” Ticket (21+)

Admittance to the day’s event, but as the name suggests, you just get to see the show—no beer samples (You can still buy select beers a la carte if you’re 21+).

Metal & Beer” Ticket (21+)

Admittance to the day’s event plus unlimited* sampling from our diverse lineup of international breweries presented by 3 Floyds. Decibel Magazine Metal & Beer Fest: Philly 2024 sampling cups provided. Limited to 550 tickets per day.

*Please note: In extremely extreme cases, certain high-ABV pours will be ticketed, with attendees receiving a limited number of tickets available to redeem for each offering.

The post All Ticket Options for Metal & Beer Fest: Philly 2024 AVAILABLE NOW! Daily Lineups Revealed! appeared first on Decibel Magazine.

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SPOILER: Here Are Decibel’s Top 40 Albums of 2023

Most readers and subscribers do not have the January 2024 issue of Decibel yet. But we all know that someone is gonna post the Top 40 Albums of the Year somewhere online. For the last decade, we’ve been forced to beat them to the punch. So, if you’re actually a Decibel subscriber and prefer remaining in suspense until the USPS gets their shit together, please read no further!

For the rest of you still here, there are three key things to consider since we began this annual tradition 19 years ago: ) Yes, we know it’s November; don’t make me explain how print deadlines work and or remind you of our access to advance music. 2) The list is still a reflection of the diverse tastes of nearly three dozen members of the Decibel staff, and 3) at least one of your favorite albums from this past year is likely not included. I can confidently state the second point because my album of the year isn’t here. Unlike me, at least you can complain about it on the internet. Anyway, here we go! —Albert Mudrian

40 Dødheimsgard, Black Medium Current, Peaceville

39 Kommodus, Wreath of Bleeding Snowfall, GoatowaRex

38 Street Tombs, Reclusive Decay, Carbonized

37 Obituary, Dying of Everything, Relapse

36 Fires in the Distance, Air Not Meant for Us, Prosthetic

35 Witching, Incendium, Translation Loss

34 Circle of Ouroborus, Lumi Vaientaa Kysymykset, His Wounds

33 Cattle Decapitation, Terrasite, Metal Blade

32 Final Gasp, Mourning Moon, Relapse

31 Spirit Adrift, Ghost at the Gallows, Century Media

30 Krigsgrav, Fires in the Fall, Wise Blood

29 Will Haven, VII, Minus Head

28 Smoulder, Violent Creed of Vengeance, Cruz del Sur

27 Kruelty, Untopia, Profound Lore

26 Night Demon, Outsider, Century Media

25 Incantation, Unholy Deification, Relapse

24 Filth Is Eternal, Find Out, MNRK

23 Cannibal Corpse, Chaos Horrific, Metal Blade

22 Great Falls, Objects Without Pain, Neurot

21 Krieg, Ruiner, Profound Lore

20 Rid of Me, Access to the Lonely, Knife Hits

19 Mizmor, Prosaic, Profound Lore

18 Autopsy, Ashes, Organs, Blood and Crypts, Peaceville

17 Cruciamentum, Obsidian Refractions, Profound Lore

16 Tribunal, The Weight of Remembrance, 20 Buck Spin

15 The Night Eternal, Fatale, Ván

14 Enslaved, Heimdal, Nuclear Blast

13 Gel, Only Constant, Convulse

12 Enforced, War Remains, Century Media

11 Blackbraid, Blackbraid II, Self-released

10 The Keening, Little Bird, Relapse

9 Thantifaxath, Hive Mind Narcosis, Dark Descent

8 Frozen Soul, Glacial Domination, Century Media

7 Lamp of Murmuur, Saturnian Bloodstorm, Argento

6 Panopticon, The Rime of Memory, Bindrune

5 Godthrymm, Distrortions, Profound Lore

4 Jesus Piece, …So Unknown, Century Media

3 Wayfarer, American Gothic, Profound Lore

2 Tomb Mold, The Enduring Spirit, 20 Buck Spin

1 Horrendous, Ontological Mysterium, Season of Mist

Now, if you’d actually like to read editorial on these releases (for, you know, context), interviews with the artists who rank near and at the top of the list as well as dozens of entertaining, contributor-conceived year-end Top 5 lists, a cover story on Panopticon  and a Hall of Fame on Cathedral’s  major label doom metal classic The Ethereal Mirror, you can grab a copy of the full issue here. It comes with an exclusive new Vastum flexi disc.

The post SPOILER: Here Are Decibel’s Top 40 Albums of 2023 appeared first on Decibel Magazine.

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Decibel Magazine Metal & Beer Fest: Philly 2024 Full Band Lineup & Breweries REVEALED!

Prepare for a high-gravity dose of bourbon barrel discipline on April 12-13, 2024, when Decibel Magazine Metal & Beer Fest: Philly—the world’s loudest, heaviest, two-day craft beer event—returns to the Fillmore Philly to deliver more lunatics of quad’s libation for its seventh year!

The classic lineup of hardcore legends Biohazard will headline the first night with an exclusive performance of their 1992 definitive album, Urban Discipline, in its entirety, while Florida death metal forebears Deicide will close out the second evening via a special set comprised exclusively of early ’90s crushers from their landmark Deicide, Legion and Once Upon the Cross records.

Our flight of special sets doesn’t end there! Brutal death metal juggernauts Dying Fetus will deliver an exclusive old-school set of their early material, while Crowbar will drop a double-hammer of sludge metal classics with a set of songs exclusively from 1998’s Odd Fellows Rest and their earth-shaking 1993 self-titled album.

The already stacked artist bill, presented by Century Media, is rounded out by: Philly blunt force deathcrushers Jesus Piece; spirited Toronto death proggers Tomb Mold; old-school NY slam legends Internal Bleeding; Midwest death metal cutting crew 200 Stab Wounds; Sacramento noise metal institution Will Haven; Richmond crossover thrash attack Enforced; underground black metal enigma Lamp of Murmuur; Little Rock death metal mob Terminal Nation; demented black/death dealers Daeva; and black/doom spellcasters Witching.

But that’s just the (sober) half of it! The weekend’s cauldron of hops is totally covered via America’s most metal breweries! The year’s beer lineup is once again presented by craft beer icons 3 Floyds Brewing (IN) and includes featured breweries WarPigs Brewing (IN), TRVE Brewing (CO), Kings County Brewers Collective (NY), Black Sky Brewery (CO), Yards Brewing (PA), Magnanimous Brewing (FL), Ever Grain Brewing Co (PA), XUL Beer Company (TN), Adroit Theory Brewing (VA), New Trail Brewing Co (PA), Holy Mountain Brewing Co (WA), Imprint Beer Co (PA), Widowmaker Brewing (MA), Attic Brewing Co (PA), Bear Cult Brewing (DE) and flagship meadery Brimming Horn Meadery (DE). Tonewood Brewing (NJ) will also be pouring.

“We look forward to Philly every year, but this year—holy shit—it’s like [Decibel editor] Albert Mudrian read my mind for what a dream lineup looks like,” says 3 Floyds’ Brewmaster Chris Boggess. “It might be the best Metal & Beer Fest lineup yet. We’ve been dying to tell everyone we know about it and can’t wait to return to Philadelphia to witness this truly siiiick event and share many beers with many maniacs once more.”

Tickets for Decibel Magazine Metal & Beer Fest: Philly are on sale on Friday, Nov 17 at 10:00 am ET. But the 3 Floyds and Century Media pre-sales start today (Wednesday, Nov 15) at 12:00 pm ET! Go here and use pre-sale codes ZOMBIEDUST or CENTURYMEDIA for early access!

All ticket option details can be found below.

Just Metal” Ticket (21+)

Admittance to the day’s event, but as the name suggests, you just get to see the show—no beer samples (You can still buy select beers a la carte if you’re 21+).

Metal & Beer” Ticket (21+)

Admittance to the day’s event plus unlimited* sampling from our diverse lineup of international breweries presented by 3 Floyds. Decibel Magazine Metal & Beer Fest: Philly 2024 sampling cups provided. Limited to 550 tickets per day.

*Please note: In extremely extreme cases, certain high-ABV pours will be ticketed, with attendees receiving a limited number of tickets available to redeem for each offering.

Hails and ales to our partners!
Century Media Records
3 Floyds Brewing
Metal Blade Records
Relapse Records
Pull The Plug Patches
Reigning Phoenix Music
MNRK Heavy
Nefarious Industries
20 Buck Spin
WarPigs Brewing
Kings County Brewers Collective
Brimming Horn Meadery
Bear Cult Brewery
Ever Grain Brewing Co.
Imprint Beer Co.
Widowmaker Brewery
XUL Beer Company
Yards Brewing Co.
TRVE Brewing Co.
Translation Loss Records
IndieMerchStore
Attic Brewing Co.
Magnanimous Brewing
Adroit Theory
Holy Mountain Brewing
Black Sky Brewery
New Trail Brewing Co.
Night Shift Merch
Tonewood Brewing

The post Decibel Magazine Metal & Beer Fest: Philly 2024 Full Band Lineup & Breweries REVEALED! appeared first on Decibel Magazine.

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Read How Cannibal Corpse Split with Chris Barnes and ‘Created to Kill’ Became ‘Vile’ In This Excerpt From ‘The Scott Burns Sessions: A Life in Death Metal 1987 – 1997’ Out Today!

Today we celebrate the official release of The Scott Burns Sessions: A Life in Death Metal 1987 – 1997, a massive oral history of the acclaimed Morrisound recording career of iconic death metal producer and engineer Scott Burns. And Decibel is proud to share the second and final excerpt from the 460-page hardcover book authored by David E. Gehlke (Turned Inside Out: The Official Story of Obituary, No Celebration: The Official Story of Paradise LostDamn the Machine: The Story of Noise Records).

The following passage takes readers back inside the hallowed halls of Morrisound in 1995 and the growing tensions between the-Cannibal Corpse vocalist Chris Barnes and the rest of the band were about to turn their Created to Kill album into Vile and rechart the course of death metal history.

—-

Cannibal Corpse booked Burns and Morrisound to record its fifth studio album, Created to Kill, in October 1995. The sessions were preceded by Six Feet Under’s Haunted a few months prior, a not-so-obvious omen that vocalist Chris Barnes was thinking about a career beyond Cannibal. While Burns enjoyed recording Haunted and thought highly of the Six Feet Under lineup, he believed there was too much going for Cannibal for them to splinter, especially after the band’s coveted appearance playing “Hammer Smashed Face” on Ace Ventura: Pet Detective, which hit theaters the year before.

Yet Created to Kill, which was eventually re-named Vile, became the most dramatic recording session of Burns’s career. The simmering disagreements over Barnes’s vocal patterns on The Bleeding blew up before his eyes, with no one agreeing on the best path forward. It often left Burns in stunned silence while Barnes and bassist Alex Webster and drummer Paul Mazurkiewicz argued, with the producer in agreement with Webster and Mazurkiewicz but worried about alienating Barnes, whom he saw as the band’s most valuable commodity. When Barnes made the ill-advised decision to abandon the remainder of his vocal tracking for a Six Feet Under European tour, it ended his tenure with the band before the album’s completion. (Barnes declined our interview requests to be part of this book.)

Monstrosity vocalist George “Corpsegrinder” Fisher was brought in to rescue the album—and Cannibal, providing a shotgun burst of energy and ferocity. Burns relished tracking Fisher but also had to ensure his immense vocal talents were harnessed; otherwise, Cannibal would be in a heap of trouble. Only adding to the situation was that Fisher was still in Monstrosity, who was also booked at Morrisound in the fall of 1995 with Burns.

Scott Burns: I loved working with Cannibal and was always happy when I’d get the call from the band or Metal Blade that they’d be coming back to do another record. However, I will say that Vile was one of the most demanding albums of my career.

Alex Webster (bass): Metal Blade never pushed us to do something different. They sometimes suggested things with our band but were not pushy overall. Atheist, Nasty Savage and us were the only bands they had that went to Morrisound. Metal Blade wasn’t pushing us not to record with Scott. I think some of the other labels he had worked with had given him a lot of work, then started sending their bands to other places. Bands like us, Deicide and Obituary, loved Scott and wanted to keep working with him. Labels are a business. We became close friends with Scott, so we wanted to keep recording with him, where labels are like, “This is hot now, so we’re going to move our business over there.” That had to be discouraging for him.

Rob Barrett (guitar): This was after we had moved to Tampa. After the touring cycle for The Bleeding, I had been pushing on these guys like, “We should move down to Florida.” I had already moved down there. I didn’t want to live in Buffalo anymore after living in Florida. They agreed. The thought process was, “If we’re recording in Tampa, we might as well move down there and get out of this weather.” Eventually, we moved down in the summer of ‘94 or ‘95.

Scott Burns: These guys all practiced six days a week for seven hours a day. Cannibal was always prepared. They even moved to Tampa, which I thought was wise for the convenience of being close to Morrisound and the nice weather. If you would talk to Alex back then, he would tell you, “This is our job. We practice, write songs, go on tour, get paid.” Barnes wasn’t putting in as much. Plus, he had Six Feet Under now, which was becoming more of a priority.

Jack Owen (guitar): I wasn’t bothered by Barnes doing Six Feet Under. I think Rob was still doing Solstice, and if I had another band, I would have kept doing it. I didn’t hold it against him.

Scott Burns: Cannibal also brought in seven-string guitars, and Alex started using a five-string. It instantly made them heavier. Because the seven strings were in a lower tuning, I stressed—like on The Bleeding—that everything had to be extremely tight. Otherwise, the guitars could sound muddy. I was excited by what they had come up with. “Devoured by Vermin” is a classic; so is “Mummified in Barbed Wire.”

Alex WebsterVile was the first album where I used a five-string bass. We went to Thoroughbred Music and rented a five-string Spector. It was just a really good bass. I still play them today.

Jack Owen: We were getting a little more technical and got newer guitars. I got a seven-string, and Alex got a five-string. Sounds were changing; maybe we were getting faster and more technical. I don’t want to say we left Chris in the dust or anything, but things were evolving in different directions.

Paul Mazurkiewicz (drums): It was frustrating. We were so pumped for the material we came up with at our practice facility. A song like “Devoured by Vermin” was next level from The Bleeding. Barnes was at practice and sang every day, but it was funny—we could never hear his vocals. I’ve never been one to need the vocals when we play. To this day, I don’t need the vocals—I need the guitars to hear the rhythm. Barnes worked as we did during practice, singing every song and working on the lyrics. We just never heard the vocals or the patterns, so we weren’t thinking much of it.

Rob Barrett: The vocals. [Laughs] That’s where there was the big blowout. I wasn’t even going in there when he was tracking. He didn’t want anybody in there. Two other guys [Mazurkiewicz and Webster] wanted to oversee what was happening because of issues on The Bleeding. Everything else seemed to go pretty smoothly with that record.

Scott Burns: I think it was more about that they wanted Barnes to try different things. They thought he was taking the easy way out or not working on things. The guys weren’t happy with Barnes the first time we did vocals. They wanted Barnes to try different things. Paul, Alex and Rob, who is a great singer in his own right, would make suggestions, very simple ones, like, “The chorus should start here.” Or, “Maybe try coming in here.” And Barnes wanted nothing to do with changing his vision. He simply said, “You guys don’t know what the fuck you’re talking about.” He was not responsive at all. It quickly became apparent that this would not end well. It was way worse than what we dealt with on The Bleeding.

Jack Owen: We had fights in the past where he would quit, they would quit and there was this side and that side. Things like, “Okay, you got your girlfriend.” “Wait, she used to be my girlfriend.” Every kind of fight you could imagine—including jumping over the drum kit to attack the drummer. For The Bleeding and Vile, I think the jealousy of Chris handling all the band’s business was one of the issues. He was the manager. That just made everything uncomfortable in the band. We took it out on his vocal delivery and lyrics, and it came to a head.

Paul Mazurkiewicz: That was the worst thing when we finally laid the music down with Scott and heard the vocals. We were so excited because we had so many great songs. But once we heard Barnes’s vocals, we felt utter dejection. We were so let down by it. It felt like the air was let out of our tires because the vocals were detracting from the songs. There was a sense of dread because the songs were getting ruined.

Scott Burns: The goal was to get Barnes’s vocals done before he left for a Six Feet Under tour. It became increasingly evident by the day that it wouldn’t happen. Alex and Paul were adamant that they didn’t like his takes, but Barnes didn’t give a fuck. Truthfully, I didn’t think his patterns were all that great. The songs were now more technical than ever. Barnes couldn’t approach them the same way. It wasn’t going to work. While he was in the booth, I tried to be patient, but I’d turn around and see Alex with a worried, frustrated look. That was the cue that things were about to get messy.

Paul Mazurkiewicz: We had to fight with him to make lines fit in the song. Barnes wrote his lyrics and didn’t want help from anyone. We were okay with that, but when he was in the booth, Alex and I started saying to each other, “Man, this doesn’t sound right.” Then we would suggest to Barnes, “Hey, if you took out this syllable or if you took out ‘uh’ or ‘the,’ then the line would fit better.” But Barnes pushed back like we were stepping all over him like it was his poetry we were ruining.

Scott Burns: Alex would take a deep breath, raise his hands, slap both hands on his knees and go, “Chris. We don’t want you to do this.” Paul would say, “You’re just not doing it.” Barnes snapped back, “You guys are assholes. You don’t get my vision.” My position was difficult. My goal was to get the best performance and sound from Barnes. I thought he would eventually budge, and they’d meet halfway. But song after song, it wasn’t coming together. It was like Cannibal was going full speed, and he was only at half.

Rob Barrett: He didn’t want to budge. Barnes had an attitude about it like, “I’m the singer, I write the lyrics, and I’m going to do what I want. That’s it.” Then it turned into a “fuck you” match. That’s why Paul and Alex were pointing things out. They weren’t feeling certain things like, “Man, that could be better.” I know Paul and Alex—they’re not callous dudes. I’m sure they probably approached it in a friendly way, like, “Hey, no offense, but that doesn’t sound as good as it could be. Maybe let’s work on the pattern or something.” That was just a direct attack on Chris’s ego. He seemed to me like the kind of kid that didn’t want to share his toys with other kids. That was the whole attitude that he had as a grownup. He didn’t like to share. He didn’t want to collaborate. It was like, “Wow, man, you’re a greedy fucking dude.”

Paul Mazurkiewicz: “Devoured by Vermin” was the last song Alex wrote. It was clear that it would be the song to start the record. We were all really into it. Then Barnes went to sing it, which was probably the worst one in our eyes. I’ll never forget Alex telling Barnes while he was still in the booth, “Hey, Chris, I’m going to rewrite the lyrics.” Barnes did not want to hear that, which was hard for him. He removed the cans [headphones] and left the studio. We’d never said those things, but it needed to be said. Otherwise, the song would have been ruined. That was the last day in the studio with Barnes.

Scott Burns: I was used to bands running over their allotted studio time. For Barnes to up and leave without finishing his parts was a big deal. There were a lot of unhappy people. This was supposed to be a huge album.

Rob Barrett: Something was going on there. We went in and recorded the music, and then he came in to do his vocals a little later because he was on tour with Six Feet Under. At first, we thought, “That’s weird.” He knows that we’re going in to record, and he’s saying, “Oh, well, you need to wait for my parts because I’m busy doing something more important.”

Paul Mazurkiewicz: We had to take a break from recording because Barnes had a tour with Six Feet Under. The premise was that we would finish the record before he went on tour. The plan was to complete tracking, then come back and mix once he returned. We were a little irked by that, but at the same time, there was a half-positive thing going, like, maybe it wouldn’t be a bad thing to take a break and come back with fresh ears. Then again, we were irked because it was like, “Dude, it’s your side project. Cannibal is our band, all of us, and you’re going to go off with your side project. Okay. Whatever.”

Alex Webster: We dismissed Chris; it just wasn’t working out. We’d had personal difficulties a little bit here and there throughout the years in the band with Chris, and it came to a head with the music.

Rob Barrett: I came in one day to Morrisound. Paul and Alex said, “We’re fucking getting rid of Chris. He’s out.” I was like, “Oh shit! This is a doozy right in the middle of recording a new album.”

Scott Burns: It was Alex who told Barnes he was out. That was one of the most uncomfortable moments for me as a producer. I had a great relationship with Barnes up until that point. I was friends with all of them—Barnes included. We always worked well together in the studio. I usually let him do his thing, but Created to Kill was totally different. Cannibal wasn’t the same band anymore—they grew apart in many ways, starting with the music but also on the business end.

Jack Owen: It happened all so fast. Alex had the talk with Chris. I was like, “Wow, I guess that’s it.”

Paul Mazurkiewicz: We had no other option at that point. The band felt strongly that we needed to do something because it was difficult for Barnes to change anything or work as a team. That wasn’t a good time to be in the studio. It was a significant change, and the last place you want to do it is in the studio since we’re wasting money.

Jack Owen: It was an unknown territory because he was the only singer we knew. There was nobody as good as him that we were going to get.

Scott Burns: There was considerable drama in the death metal world because Metal Blade was furious. There was lots of shouting over the phone from [owner] Brian Slagel and [president] Mike Faley over who was right or wrong. The rest of the Cannibal guys were adamant that they wanted a record where the vocals fit. Metal Blade saw it as Cannibal was losing their most visible asset, Barnes.

Jack Owen: Brian Slagel was not happy about that at all.

Paul Mazurkiewicz: Metal Blade was irked that we were kicking out our singer. It was a big deal for an established band, and The Bleeding did well. They and many people agreed, “What are you doing here?” It was like we were committing suicide, but we knew what to do. Of course, we felt George was the man, and things would improve.

Rob Barrett: Barnes’s attitude was like, “I was going to leave anyway,” because he’s got his new supergroup going on. At that point, we were like, “All right, well, we got the new album recorded except for the vocals, so what are we going to do?” Some of the guys were throwing around names of people that we should maybe try out. Then I said, “Man, we should just get George. We shouldn’t even try anybody else.”

Paul Mazurkiewicz: The band sat there saying, “Scott, this is what we’re going to do.” We had to convince Scott since he was almost the ringleader in the situation. We had been around each other long enough, and Scott was part of the band to understand the inner workings of Cannibal. We were dealing with someone very difficult in Barnes.

Scott Burns: I thought Barnes was irreplaceable. I had no idea who could take his place, but occasionally, amid the drama and confusion, Rob Barrett would speak up and say, “Let’s bring in George.” Rob was the easiest to get on board with the decision. I’ll stress this: The decision to remove Barnes was ultimately the band’s. Alex and the guys knew I didn’t think Barnes’s performance was up to par, but kicking out a band member was not my territory. I wasn’t thinking about George [“Corpsegrinder” Fisher] at the time. I worried about getting the album done and didn’t see how we would do it without Barnes. I remember the Cannibal guys saying they didn’t care if Metal Blade dropped them. They wanted to make one record where they were as happy with the vocals as the music. It took a lot of courage to make that call.

To read the full Vile entry, order a copy of The Scott Burns Sessions: A Life in Death Metal 1987 – 1997 exclusively via the Decibel webstore right here.

Read another The Scott Burns Sessions: A Life in Death Metal 1987 – 1997 on the making of Death’s landmark Human album here.

The post Read How Cannibal Corpse Split with Chris Barnes and ‘Created to Kill’ Became ‘Vile’ In This Excerpt From ‘The Scott Burns Sessions: A Life in Death Metal 1987 – 1997’ Out Today! appeared first on Decibel Magazine.

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Get a FREE Patch with All ‘Black Metal: Evolution of the Cult’ Pre-Orders While Supplies Last!

We’re inching closer to the U.S. release of Black Metal: Evolution of the Cult—Restored, Expanded & Definitive Edition and to celebrate, the first 500 pre-orders of the book will now receive a FREE 3-inch x 4-inch woven patch of the incredible cover art courtesy of Pull the Plug Patches (while supplies last)! Pre-order your copy now!

Black Metal: Evolution of the Cult—Restored, Expanded & Definitive Edition, the acclaimed authoritative black metal history authored by Dayal Patterson, returns as a massive 800+ page hardcover book available exclusively in North America for pre-order via Decibel Books now.

“I first worked with Decibel’s Albert Mudrian some 20 years ago when I interviewed him for my fanzine, Crypt,” says Patterson, also the founder of Cult Never Dies publishing. “We’ve kept in touch since then, and Cult Never Dies and Decibel have collaborated on multiple projects, with us printing editions of their books for European readers and them creating U.S. editions of their books for ours. It was therefore a no-brainer that we would work together in bringing this mammoth new title to U.S. readers and we are extremely happy to have what is probably our most important title in safe and trusted hands.”

This ultimate edition of Black Metal: Evolution of the Cult includes 120,000 words of new content (over 20 new chapters and 20 expanded chapters), over 60 new interviews (over 130 total), an eye-popping 80-page color photo section, vastly improved layout and a stunning new illustrated cover.

Pre-order Black Metal: Evolution of the Cult—Restored, Expanded & Definitive Edition from Decibel Books now and avoid costly overseas shipping! European customers can order directly from Cult Never Dies right here.

INCLUDES ARTIST INTERVIEWS FROM:
Venom • Mercyful Fate • Bathory • Hellhammer • Celtic Frost • Sodom • Destruction • Sepultura • Vulcano • Holocausto • Mystifier • Blasphemy • Samael • Rotting Christ • Necromantia • Deviser • Agatus • Zemial • Tormentor • Master’s Hammer • Von • Mayhem • Thorns • Darkthrone • Burzum • Immortal • Emperor • Gehenna • Gorgoroth • Trelldom • Beherit • Impaled Nazarene • Cradle Of Filth • Dimmu Borgir • Les Legions Noire • Marduk • Dissection • Vinterland • The Black • Watain • Shining • Strid • Forgotten Woods • Bethlehem • Silencer • Forgotten Tomb • Lifelover • Graveland • Infernum • Behemoth • Hades • Helheim • Isengard/Storm • Kampfar • Windir • Primordial • October Falls • Enslaved • Satyricon • Ulver • Mortem • Arcturus • Fleurety • In the Woods… • Manes • Ved Buens Ende • Dødheimsgard • Sigh • Deathspell Omega • Mysticum • Aborym • Blacklodge • Black Witchery • Hecate Enthroned • Winterfylleth • Fen • Profanatica
and much more!

The post Get a FREE Patch with All ‘Black Metal: Evolution of the Cult’ Pre-Orders While Supplies Last! appeared first on Decibel Magazine.

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Album Premiere: Cirkeln – “The Primitive Covenant”

Back in 2019, a shadowy figure named Våndarr released a self-titled three-track demo under the project name Cirkeln. After that demo, Cirkeln released an EP and two full-length records nodding to Bathory’s genre-spawning influences. In barely four years since, Våndarr has slashed his mark on the crowded battlefield of solo black metal. Like an arcane premonition, today we summon Cirkeln’s third LP The Primitive Covenant a few days before its November 3rd release from True Cult Records.

While Cirkeln’s other albums nodded most prominently to Quorthon’s epic black metal, there’s a more acidic and abrasive approach here. The song lengths still regularly venture past five minutes, apart from a cover by Swedish rock provocateurs The Leather Nun. But even when a track crosses the seven minute mark (“Garden of Thrones” and “The Witch Bell”), there’s unbridled urgency. But that doesn’t mean this is just wall-to-wall ballast and blast beats. In “Defiled and Satanized,” Våndarr follows clean croons with one of the album’s most punishing sections. A track later, there’s an atmospheric sanctuary between raging waves of raw distortion. Album closer “The Death of Thy Father” opens with an anthemic dash of trad metal leads then stomps its way to a triumphant conclusion. The record is an impressively diverse offering, deliberate with its ideas but diabolical in its delivery.

“What I am the most proud about when it comes to this third record is that I think it cements Cirkeln as a band that doesn’t make the same album twice,” Våndarr shares. “For all their flaws, I think that all my releases do something different than the last. To me, The Primitive Covenant is the farthest I’ve ever strayed from what listeners were expecting. Sure, it’s still black metal at its core. But I hope it comes across that I have no interest in re-treading A Song To Sorrow. My hope is that the listeners can look at the two records as two different works with very different goals and appreciate them for what they’re trying to do. I know I can.”

Enter the garden of thorns and press play on Cirkeln’s vicious new record below.

The Primitive Covenant by Cirkeln

Pre-order The Primitive Covenant from True Cult Records HERE

Follow Cirkeln for news and updates HERE

The post Album Premiere: Cirkeln – “The Primitive Covenant” appeared first on Decibel Magazine.

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VASTUM to Release Exclusive New Track, “Befouled in Self-Salvation,” via the Decibel Flexi Series

Bay Area old-school death dealers Vastum are leaving their murky stain on the underground with new album Inward to Gethsemane, but only Decibel subscribers will have access to “Befouled in Self-Salvation,” a track saved exclusively for the Decibel Flexi Series! This rare slab of floppy vinyl is absolutely vital to any respectable OSDM collection. Save yourself the trouble and sign up for a deluxe Decibel subscription by November 6 at noon ET, lest your collection be purged of greatness!

The post VASTUM to Release Exclusive New Track, “Befouled in Self-Salvation,” via the Decibel Flexi Series appeared first on Decibel Magazine.

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THE RED CHORD Premiere Exclusive Live Version of “Dreaming in Dog Years” via the Decibel Flexi Series

We are counting the days until we witness the 2023 return of The Red Chord as part of this year’s Decibel Magazine Metal & Beer Fest: Denver in December at the Summit! And to raise the anticipation level even higher, we’ve released a live rendition of their classic “Dreaming in Dog Years,” recorded at the 2022 Philly edition of Metal & Beer Fest, as part of our Decibel Flexi Series!

Amazingly, this is the first-ever official release from the Red Chord on vinyl! The track isn’t available anywhere else, but you can jam it below now. Then head off to the dB store where we have an extremely limited amount of the issues containing the Red Chord flexi available.

And if you can’t get enough live Red Chord, get tickets now to see them at Decibel Magazine Metal & Beer Fest: Denver—the world’s loudest, two-day craft beer event—at the Summit on Dec 1-2, 2023. Daily lineups and info on each ticket option below!

Purchase Decibel Magazine Metal & Beer Fest: Denver Two-Day tickets
Purchase Decibel Magazine Metal & Beer Fest: Denver December 1 tickets
Purchase Decibel Magazine Metal & Beer Fest: Denver December 2 tickets

DECEMBER 1, 2023
Khemmis

Cephalic Carnage
The Red Chord
KEN mode
Morbikon
Phobocosm
The Munsens

DECEMBER 2, 2023
Agalloch

Midnight
Primitive Man
Krypts
The Keening
Mother of Graves
Astral Tomb

The post THE RED CHORD Premiere Exclusive Live Version of “Dreaming in Dog Years” via the Decibel Flexi Series appeared first on Decibel Magazine.